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Hepatitis

HCSP Fact Sheet: A Simple Guide to Reading an Abstract

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This information sheet focuses on tips for reading and understanding an abstract, which can be very challenging for most people. It states that there are usually seven pieces to an abstract, then breaks them down and gives hints on how to understand them. It includes a copy of an abstract to illustrate how to go through each section. The fact sheet is geared toward people with hepatitis.

HCSP Fact Sheet: Alcohol and HCV

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This information sheet discusses why it is important to abstain from alcohol after being diagnosed with with hepatitis C virus (HCV), especially for patients undergoing antiviral therapy. It states that patients who drink during HCV treatment are less likely to clear the virus. The fact sheet gives tips to check for alcohol abuse and has a table with information on different types of liquor.

HCSP Fact Sheet: African Americans and Hepatitis C

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This information sheet states that there are clear differences in terms of chronicity, disease progression, and treatment response rates among different ethnic and racial groups with regard to hepatitis C virus (HCV), with the African American population the most pronounced. It says that African Americans are more likely to have been exposed to HCV and are less likely to resolve acute HCV infection compared to other racial/ethnic groups. The fact sheet gives information about HCV, disease progression, and treatment.

The ABCs of Hepatitis

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This information sheet presents facts about viral hepatitis in tabular format. It discusses hepatitis A, B, and C. It lists statistics; routes of transmission; persons at risk; incubation period; symptoms of acute infection; the likelihood of symptomatic acute infection; the potential for chronic infection; the severity; serologic tests for acute and chronic infection; screening recommendations for chronic infection; treatment; vaccination recommendations and schedule, if any; and testing recommendations.

Even If You Feel Healthy, You Could Still Have Hepatitis C

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This poster says that even if a person feels healthy and has no symptoms, he/she can still have hepatitis C. It says that everyone born between 1945-1965 should get tested for HCV, because if left untreated, it can lead to cancer. This poster is also available in a larger size (24 x 36 in.) at http://www.cdc.gov/knowmorehepatitis/media/posters.htm.

UFO: A Model HCV Prevention Intervention for Young Adult IDU

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This webinar presents an intervention to show young adult injecting drug users how to prevent being infected by the hepatitis C virus. There is a follow-up questionnaire and the participant receives a printable certificate of completion.

Newly Diagnosed: Hepatitis C

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This pamphlet discusses hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) for the newly-diagnosed patient. It explains the disease including acute and chronic infection, its symptoms, effect on the liver, treatment including the two oral medications cleared by the Federal Drug Administration for patients with hepatitis C genotype 1, preventing transmission to others, treatment outcomes and complications of chronic HCV, and the outlook for people with chronic HCV. It includes a list of questions for the patient to ask his/her healthcare provider and a list of resources.

Hepatitis C: Why Baby Boomers Should Get Tested

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This information sheet discusses why baby boomers should get tested for Hepatitis C. It states that baby boomers are five times more likely to have Hepatitis C due to contaminated blood and blood products before widespread screening in 1992 or from injecting drugs. The information sheet discusses testing, symptoms, long term effects, and treatment of hepatitis C. This information sheet is also available in B&W at: http://www.cdc.gov/knowmorehepatitis/Media/PDFs/FactSheet-Boomers-BW.pdf.

Hepatitis C: Por Que los Baby Boomers Deben Hacerse un Analisis

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This information sheet discusses why baby boomers should get tested for Hepatitis C. It states that baby boomers are five times more likely to have Hepatitis C due to contaminated blood and blood products before widespread screening in 1992 or from injecting drugs. The information sheet discusses testing, symptoms, long term effects, and treatment of hepatitis C. This information sheet is also available in B&W at: http://www.cdc.gov/knowmorehepatitis/Media/PDFs/FactSheet-Boomers-BW_sp.pdf.

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